BY JAN HAAG

POETRY + ESSAYS + MUSIC + TRAVEL + FICTION + TEXTILE ART

INTRODUCTION + HAAG'S BIO





PHILLIP MORTON SMITH






Phil Smith, 91 and one month, died just after the summer solstice on June 25, 1997. Born on May 22, 1906 in Arlington, Washington, the eldest of five brothers and one sister, he came of an unbroken line of descent from Samuel Smith and Elizabeth Smyth who, arriving with their two-year-old son Philip in Boston in 1634, helped found several of the earliest townships in the colonies: Wethersfield, Connecticut, Hadley and Athol, Massachusetts, and Guilford, Vermont. In 1836 the Smiths migrated West. Phil's parents, Mary Blanche Morton and Udell Revere Smith, both born in Nebraska, moved, as did other family members, to the Pacific Northwest in the early part of the twentieth century.


Phil grew up in Blanchard, Washington, graduated from Edison High School, and later in life attended the University of Washington. His working life began in the logging camps and sawmills around Blanchard and Everett. He had a long career as a buyer of housewares, glass, and fine china, holding positions at the Grand Leader, Everett, BB Furniture, Bellingham, Weisfield & Goldberg, Tacoma, McDougall-Southwick and Ernst Hardware in Seattle. During World War II he served with the Office of Price Stabilization.


He spent a number of years as a Manufacturer's Agent for Federal Glass and other companies, dealing in housewares and fine bone china. His territory included Washington, Oregon, Montana and Alaska. The Philip Smith Mountains of Alaska were named for him in 1969. A life long member of the Seattle Pot and Kettle Club, he served as President of the Seattle club for two terms in 1947 and 1948 and as International President in 1953-54. Upon retirement, he opened Phil Smith Imports, traveling frequently to Europe and other countries both for business and pleasure. As a volunteer, he taught retailing and the import/export business at North Seattle Community Colleges, at the YMCA, in Seminars around the Northwest and, for a decade, was a SCORE consultant, a specialist in import/export, for the SBA.


Phil's childhood sweetheart and wife of fifty-seven years, Doris Sophie Peppler Smith, died in 1986. As young marrieds living in Everett, Phil and Doris studied with the Theosophical Society in Seattle and, though professing no particular religion, lived always by the gentle principles of compassion and love, with a respect for Christian Science. Wherever he lived, Phil created beautiful gardens. He also golfed, cycled, fished, and was one of the best wild berry pickers in the Pacific Northwest. His special passion was for dancing and listening to Jazz. As a member of the Puget Sound Traditional Jazz Society with his dear friend and beloved companion of later years, Betty Hansen, he traveled to innumberable Jazz gatherings and Festivals. By 91, Phil had become quite the grand old man of Jazz, who, though he had some trouble walking, could always get up and dance.


Surviving relatives include his three children, Conley Smith, Helen Hawley, and Jan Haag; three grandchildren, Suzanne Hawley Hughes, Jana Hawley Mcfee, and Samuel Hawley; four great grandchildren, Rosa and Thomas Hughes, Natt and Eleanor McFee; his sister, Florence Lowe, and brother, Burnell Smith. There will be no services. The family wishes to express its gratitude to Hospice. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be sent to The Arboretum Foundation, 2300 Arboretum Dr. E., Seattle, WA 98112, or to Swedish Home Hospice, 5701 6th Avenue South, Suite 504, Seattle, WA 98108-9808.








Copyright © 2000 Jan Haag
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Jan Haag may be reached via e-mail: jhaag@u.washington.edu



A FEMINIST DAUGHTER'S FATHER POEMS

Father

A Father's Death

Phillip Morton Smith

Pursuing Her Father

The Origins of the World




BY JAN HAAG


POETRY + MUSIC + ESSAYS + TRAVEL + FICTION + TEXTILE ART

INTRODUCTION + HAAG'S BIO



21st CENTURY ART, C.E. - B.C., A Context